Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine

(10 reviews) Write a Review
SKU:
juki-hzl-29z
UPC:
189684000503
Condition:
New
Availability:
Usually leaves our warehouse on the same business day.
Weight:
17.00 LBS
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
  • Juki HZL-29Z Sewing Machine Stitch Patterns
  • Juki HZL 29Z Sewing Machine
MSRP: $319.00
$129.00
— You save $190.00

Description

From Juki comes the sleek and compact HZL-29Z. A lightweight portable and easy to use machine that can tackle most of your sewing needs. Juki quality, smooth and quiet operation, the HZL-29Z is a pleasure to work on. The Juki 29Z features two extra front feed dogs to assist in feeding material more evenly than tradional feed systems. The Juki HZL-29Z is one compact machine that will sew light weight fabrics to denim with ease.

Product Features:

 

22 Stitch Patterns

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Automatic Needle Threader

 

To thread your needle, just lower the lever and turn it back and forth!

 

   

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  Drop In Bobbin

Preparing the bobbin thread has never been easier.

You'll always know just how much bobbin thread you have left. Just look through the transparent bobbin cover.

     
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Easy Start Sew

Push the button on the presser foot and you're ready to sew!

     
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4 step buttonholes

 

Creating balanced buttonholes is easy with the built-in 4-step buttonhole option

 

     
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Bright white LED light

Brighten up your needle area with the built-in LED light. The light will never heat up, even during your longest sewing sessions.


     
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7 point feed dog system

No matter the weight of your fabric, you can rest assured that the 7-point feed dog will feed evenly and consistenly through the machine.

     

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Changeable needle positions

Zigzag width and needle positions can be easily adjusted with just the turn of a dial.


     
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Free Arm and Accessory Box

Need to sew cuffs or pant legs? Remove the accessory table and you're ready to go!


 

 

  Included Accessories:

  • Foot control
  • Zipper foot
  • Buttonhole foot
  • Extra bobbins
  • Needles
  • Instruction book
  • Warranty card

Juki Company Warranty

  • 5 Years Mechanical Defects
  • 2 Years Electrical
  • 90 Days Adjustments on Defects in Material or Workmanship

 

Specifications:

Stitch Length: Max. 4mm

Stitch Width: Max. 6.5mm

Presser Foot Lift: 2-Step Max. 9.5mm

Dimensions:

Wide: 388 mm (15.275 inch)

High: 280 mm (11.023 inch)

Deep: 198 mm (7.795 inch)

Weight: 5.9 Kg (13 Lb)

 

 

 

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10 Reviews

  • 5
    Great little machine for the money

    Posted by HotPuppy on 31st Oct 2018

    First, I'm not a sewing pro in the sense of being a quilter, clothes maker, or DIY maven. In fact, I'm sort of a stranger in most sewing stores as I'm a guy. Don't let that fool you though.

    I have over 10 years of commercial embroidery experience running thousands of shirts, hats, bags and more through machines. I've owned Melco and Tajima machines over the years ranging from a 12 head, 6 needle machine, to 6 networked 16 needle machines. I currently own a two head and single head Tajima 9 needle machine. Embroidery requires adjustment for the fabric type and dealing with pull compensation and run speed. We run designs anywhere from 300 stitches per minute up to 1500 stitches per minute. My current machines are happiest between 300 and 650 stitches per minute. Designs can range up to 50,000 stitches.

    I also have owned a Sailrite walking foot machine and built bimini covers and changed a roller furling cover on my sail for a 27 foot sailboat. Sewing canvas and sails is a completely different zoo than sewing fabric.

    I love my Tajima machines which are essentially Japanese computerized sewing machines. I despised my Sailrite and found it to be an imprecise piece of Taiwanese junk that was finicky and not a particularly nice machine to work with.

    I had a few sewing projects and wanted to branch out to making embroidered pillows with crafty designs. I needed to make some curtains for the house and I have an RV that is going to need lots of curtains and some upholstery projects. Seemed like the perfect excuse to buy a sewing machine.

    Juki is the gold standard in industrial machines. I was a little apprehensive in reading the reviews on here. Some folks had some bad experiences. I've had bad experiences with a sewing machine in the past (sailrite) so I was concerned. My friends in the embroidery biz reassured me that Juki was a good machine.

    For the price, I figured what have I got to lose? It's really inexpensive and I wanted something small. I was a little put off by the pink flowery stuff on the machine. It really would be great for a young lady. It's kind of grown on me as it's been sitting there.

    The machine was well packed and showed up unscathed by United Package Smashers. It was surprisingly complete and came with bobbins, a seam ripper, and several other accessories. The foot pedal is a little plasticy feeling, but the machine seems solid and lightweight. It's not a 80 pound industrial fabric muncher.... but that's fine. Most of us at home want something we can move without a team lift!

    I made a trip to my local fabric superstore and bought an assortment of fabric. I bought a heavy canvas type material that really would be at home on a sofa or chair cushion. It was in the bargain bin and I figured I would use it for testing and to make some sample pillows. It's a solid fabric but a bit tough to cut with my pinking shears. I put a couple of pieces together and proceeded to start sewing. The machine was smooth, reasonably quiet, and fed well. All sewing machines make noise. I chose a mechanical machine because I just need it to sew. I didn't want to lean on my IT background to program the machine. I also think it will be more reliable. Setting up the thread feed was easy! It's numbered and a guide is printed right on it. Threading 72 threadpaths on a commercial embroidery machine is much more tedious. The machine has a nice threading device on it, but honestly I find just putting on my reading glasses makes it so much easier to thread needles. Wish I'd realized that years ago!

    All in all this is a great basic sewing machine and should serve the average user well. At the price point it's offered at you can hardly go wrong. I plan to pick up some accessories for it and a serger to handle seaming. I'm actually excited about having a solid little sewing machine and seeing all sorts of things I can do. :) For years I've bought curtains, bags, covers, and other fabric things. It's difficult to find what I want and I always have to settle. I feel like now I can just make what I want and add embellishment to it if I want to embroider it. It's way easier to embroider cut pieces of fabric before it's sewn together.

  • 4
    My ignorance got me off to a rough start - this looks like a great machine for the price!

    Posted by love2hike on 31st Oct 2018

    After viewing the JUKI DVD that came with my JUKI HZL-29Z sewing machine, I wound a bobbin and set up the machine. I opted to use the vertical spool holder and successfully wound a bobbin. (As this was quite unlike the S machine I had for three decades, my learning curve was slow. I neglected to insert and wind the bobbin thread properly before allowing the upper thread to pick up the lower thread from the bobbin. That resulted in unsatisfactory tension in my test run of the machine. After reading JUKI threads onthe internet, I learned one sewer had inserted the bobbin "upside down." Reading that, I flipped my bobbin, discovered the threading image on the base of the sewing surface, and presto! The JUKI sewed with the proper tension at a setting of 5. The JUKI is quiet, replacing an old S machine with replacement gears that necessitated wearing hearing protection. So far, I'm quite pleased with the lightweight JUKI and the simple sewing I am doing. With a four-year warranty and a free one year service from the sewing machine shop at which I made my purchase, I'm confident this has been a good purchase for me.
    Addendum: I've been using the JUKI now for three weeks on several projects. While I'm pleased with its basic sewing functions, I find it difficult to change the needle and to use the automatic threaded; the space between the sewing surface and the lower part of the upper arm measures 2 & 5/8 inches high - not enough space for my small hand to easily maneuver to perform basic functions like changing the needle. I'm ambidextrous, so it's possible I'm doing some of these things like a left-handed. That doesn't discount that the work area is crowded, however.

  • 4
    My ignorance got me off to a rough start - this looks like a great machine for the price!

    Posted by love2hike on 10th May 2018

    After viewing the JUKI DVD that came with my JUKI HZL-29Z sewing machine, I wound a bobbin and set up the machine. I opted to use the vertical spool holder and successfully wound a bobbin. (As this was quite unlike the S machine I had for three decades, my learning curve was slow. I neglected to insert and wind the bobbin thread properly before allowing the upper thread to pick up the lower thread from the bobbin. That resulted in unsatisfactory tension in my test run of the machine. After reading JUKI threads onthe internet, I learned one sewer had inserted the bobbin "upside down." Reading that, I flipped my bobbin, discovered the threading image on the base of the sewing surface, and presto! The JUKI sewed with the proper tension at a setting of 5. The JUKI is quiet, replacing an old S machine with replacement gears that necessitated wearing hearing protection. So far, I'm quite pleased with the lightweight JUKI and the simple sewing I am doing. With a four-year warranty and a free one year service from the sewing machine shop at which I made my purchase, I'm confident this has been a good purchase for me.
    Addendum: I've been using the JUKI now for three weeks on several projects. While I'm pleased with its basic sewing functions, I find it difficult to change the needle and to use the automatic threaded; the space between the sewing surface and the lower part of the upper arm measures 2 & 5/8 inches high - not enough space for my small hand to easily maneuver to perform basic functions like changing the needle. I'm ambidextrous, so it's possible I'm doing some of these things like a left-handed. That doesn't discount that the work area is crowded, however.

  • 5
    Five Stars

    Posted by Pink on 10th May 2018

    Love it!!

  • 3
    sounds like freight train going through your sewing room

    Posted by Carla Leslie on 10th May 2018

    Very loud...sounds like freight train going through your sewing room...

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